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Decision-making and the law: When your brother or sister can’t make a decision, who does?

Mental capacity laws affect the way services are provided for your brother or sister and the way professionals carry out decision-making. This is a hugely important issue to have knowledge about as an adult siblings of someone with a life-long learning disability and/or autism. Being next of kin by itself does not give you any legal rights as a sibling. This is also the case for your parents. We recommend that you take time to read our guide on mental capacity so that you feel empowered to be involved in the decision-making processes about your brother or sister’s finances, living situation, friendships, health and wellbeing.
Download Sibs – Guide for adult siblings on decision-making and mental capacity – March 2018


Looking after money: When your disabled brother or sister needs support to manage their benefits and funding

Many people with a learning disability and/or autism need support to manage their finances and to help them receive the right benefits. This can be complex and confusing for siblings, particularly if you are taking on this role from your parent. This guide will give you information about the types of financial support available for your brother or sister, including benefits, grants, and personal budgets. It will also tell you about the different types of special legal permissions you need in order to manage someone else’s finances or to make financial decisions on their behalf.
Download Sibs- Guide for adult siblings on managing finances – March 2018


Keeping savings safe: When your disabled brother or sister can’t manage a large amount of money, who can?

As a sibling of someone with a lifelong learning disability and/or autism you may have thought about financial provision for your brother or sister in the future. It can be difficult for siblings to talk to their parents about these issues. It is even harder for siblings who are left with difficult financial situations to deal with after their parents are gone. Many siblings have questions about how savings or assets affect their brother or sister’s benefits or how owning a house might affect their contribution to care costs.  Feeling more informed about wills and trusts can be a weight off your mind. Read our guide and take action today.
Download Sibs – Guide for adult siblings on wills and trusts – March 2018


What to do if your disabled brother or sister doesn’t receive the care that they should

Unfortunately, many siblings tell us that their brother or sister with a learning disability and/or autism has experienced discrimination, has received poor care or has been mistreated. Siblings can feel ignored by service providers who don’t recognise the sibling role, and who dismiss a sibling’s concerns. Siblings often feel upset or guilty themselves, at having seen their brother or sister experience substandard treatment. Read our guide on making a complaint to feel more informed and empowered when raising an issue about your disabled brother or sister’s care.
Download Sibs – Guide for adult siblings on making a complaint – March 2018


Top tips for adult siblings on working with care providers

Working with your brother or sister’s care home or supported living setting can be difficult at times. You might feel that your views aren’t listened to or that you aren’t kept up to date with important issues. Have a look at our top tips for siblings on this issue, and take action to improve your working relationship.
Download Sibs – Top tips for adult siblings on working with care providers


Care provider statement of intent to involve siblings

Care homes and supported living settings that recognise and value siblings want to actively involve them in their disabled brother or sister’s care. Care providers can demonstrate their commitment to communicating with, listening to and involving siblings by signing this statement of intent. Siblings – take this to your brother or sister’s care provider and ask them to sign it.
Download Sibs – Care provider statement of intent to involve siblings


The impact of challenging behaviour on you: When your disabled brother or sister’s behaviour is harmful or aggressive

As a sibling of someone with a lifelong learning disability and/or autism you may have experienced challenging behaviour from your brother or sister. You may have experienced this growing up with your brother or sister, and may have had little support or information at the time. You may be struggling with understanding your brother or sister’s behaviour as an adult and may be wondering what steps you can take to help your brother or sister with this. Read our guide on challenging behaviour to help you to understand why challenging behaviour occurs, recognise how it impacts on you as a sibling and address how you can support yourself and your disabled brother or sister.
Download Sibs – Guide for adult siblings on impact of challenging behaviour – March 2018